Red Cross and United States Lifeguard Association – Rip Current Safety

The Red Cross and United States Lifeguard Association U.S.L.A. have earned big respect for the long time and continued Marine Ocean Safety performed in San Diego California, through out America and world wide.

This is an open letter to you and the public in hopes of precipitating outdated and over due lifesaving changes in current Rip Current policies adopted by the Red Cross and United States Lifeguard Association U.S.L.A. over fifty years ago.

Current (and outdated) Rip Current policies promoted by the Red Cross and United States Lifeguard Association U.S.L.A. and taught by Jr. Lifeguard programs through out the nation are obsolete, incomplete and potentially dangerous.

Scientific studies by Oceanographer Dr. J. MacMahan have proven swimming side ways to escape rip currents is more dangerous than simply floating on one’s back.

Rather than advocating “blindly” swimming parallel to the beach to escape rip currents we the Willis brothers Milton B. Willis and Michael C. Willis advocate the Willis Way — swim to the nearest waves to escape rip currents.

Rip-Current-Willis-Way-Sign

In addition current Red Cross Rip Current and United States Lifeguard Association policies do not address how to effectively avoid Rip Currents. The Willis way to avoid Rip Currents states simply wade or swim in front of the waves.

Current Red Cross and United States Lifeguard Association U.S.L.A. Rip Current policy NEEDS to be updated to ensure better and more accurate lifesaving information for the public.

New signs should be posted to replace the current outdated signs and all Jr. Lifeguard programs need to discontinue disseminating inaccurate and outdated safety information concerning Rip Currents and updated to the Willis Way to survive Rip Currents.

We will be happy to meet with you and a panel of qualified Ocean Safety experts at any time in an effort to help establish safer and more intelligent Ocean Safety Policy for the benefit of the current population and future generations alike.

Thank you,

Milton B. Willis and Michael C. Willis.